The Laubichler Lab

The Manfred Laubichler Lab at ASU studies evolutionary novelties from genomes to knowledge systems, the structure of evolutionary theory and the evolution of knowledge by means of computational approaches. Projects in the lab create new methods, tools and digital infrastructures for the history and philosophy of science.

News

Intro to Python Workshop

  • Posted on: 2 May 2019
  • By: admin

Join us for the Digital Innovation Group workshop “Intro to Python” on May 8th and 9th, 2019! Did you always wanted to learn how to program with Python, but never got a chance? If so, this workshop might be exactly what you were looking for. We will teach you your first steps with the Python programming language, how to use the Python Ecosystem (pip, virtual environments, etc.), and will also introduce you to Git and GitHub. No prior programming knowledge required! Find out more.

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Join the Data Jiu-Jitsu in R sessions with Ken Aiello!

  • Posted on: 7 February 2019
  • By: admin

Every week we will be grappling with data collection, management, and/or analysis. Using R we will explore topics from data science, statistics, and machine learning. R is widely used in statistics and data science and has a lot of modules for traditional statistics and modern machine learning algorithms. Find out more here.

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Ken Aiello’s Dissertation Defense

  • Posted on: 8 November 2018
  • By: admin


On November 7, 2018, Ken Aiello successfully defended his dissertation titled “Systematic Analysis of the Factors Contributing to the Variation and Change of the Microbiome Concept.” He will continue his research as a postdoctoral researcher in the Global Biosocial Complexity Initiative. The Laubichler Lab congratulates Dr. Aiello on a job well done!

Want to know what Aiello’s dissertation is about? Read the abstract!

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THE COMPUTATIONAL ANTHROPOCENE

  • Posted on: 5 November 2018
  • By: admin

Mankind finds itself in the Anthropocene, the current geological epoch generally accepted by scholars and denoted by one species, our own, ascending to the role of major driver on Earth. The term Anthropocene was first-coined in the eponymous article by Paul Crutzen and Eugene Stoermer in the IGBP Global Newsletter [1]. Later, Crutzen argues in "Geology of Mankind" [2] that human effects on the global ecosystem have accelerated and are now the primary influence on the global ecosystem. This human-domination over nature necessitates a new epochal designation; in contrast to the previous epoch, the Holocene, that designated the post-glacial geological period proposed by Sir Charles Lyell in Principles of Geology [3] in 1833 and adopted in 1885 by the International Geological Congress (IGC). Read the story here.

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Living organisms find a critical balance

  • Posted on: 10 October 2018
  • By: admin

A research team led by Bryan Daniels with the direction of Sara Walker of the School of Earth and Space Exploration just published the paper "Criticality Distinguishes the Ensemble of Biological Regulatory Networks". Read the story here.

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