presentations

Evolutionary Systems Biology Workshop

Manfred Laubichler gave a talk "The Regulatory Genome in Development and Evolution" at the Evolutionary Systems Biology workshop at the Konrad Lorenz Institute in Altenberg, September 5 - 8, 2013.


ESB is an emerging field of evolutionary investigation. It combines systems biology, which is focused on dynamic cellular processes, with evolutionary analyses of populations and organisms. There are several motivations for synthesizing evolutionary and systems-biological perspectives. One is that network properties need to be understood in a variety of organisms, and network models can effectively be generalized through evolutionary analyses. Another is to explain network-level properties such as robustness. A third is to gain a mechanistic understanding of mutational effects, and a fourth is to extend systems-biology – currently focused on intracellular networks – to intercellular networks that have emerged in coevolutionary relationships. (Read more).

Getting Inside the Black Box


Manfred Laubichler gave a talk at the Santa Fe Institute workshop "Getting Inside the Black Box: Technological Evolution and Economic Growth" that brought together researchers from a variety of disciplines to make first steps toward constructing a theory of technological change. The title of the workshop is in honor of a phrase used by Nathan Rosenberg, who three decades ago pleaded with the economics profession to open the "black box" of technological change. Following his inspiration, this workshop focused on understanding ecosystems of interacting technologies and the factors that cause them to evolve through time. During the month of August, in a series of small-sized working sessions, researchers congregated at SFI to take stock of the current state of research, identify commonalities and differences in the processes that generate novelty in the technological, biological and social domains, and sketch a research agenda for future work. Participants included economists, biologists, applied mathematicians, physicists, engineers, archaeologists and anthropologists.

Future of Historical Network Research, Hamburg


On Sunday, September 15, PhD candidates Julia Damerow and Erick Peirson gave an invited presentation at the Future of Historical Network Research conference in Hamburg, Germany, titled "Don't Panic! A research system for network-based digital history of science." Their presentation was a part of a panel on overlaps between Network Analysis and the Digital Humanities, and focused on the Vogon and Quadriga text-annotation platform (developed by the ASU Digital Innovation Group) as a method for building historical network datasets from large text corpora. Erick described the Genecology Project as an example of how the Vogon/Quadriga platform can be implemented for collaborative research in the history of science. (Read more...)

Presentations @ ISHPSSB 2013, Montpellier

Students and faculty from the Center for Biology & Society have returned from the 2013 biennial meeting of the International Society for the History, Philosophy, and Social Studies of Biology (ISHPSSB, or Ishkabibble) in Montpellier, France.

ASU students gave the following presentations over the course of the week-long conference...

Workshop: 2nd Open Global Systems Science Conference

In Brussels, Belgium on June 10–12, Manfred Laubichler attended the second Open Global System Science (GSS) Conference. During the session ln knowledge technologies for GSS, Dr. Laubichler delivered a talk as well as led a discussion on “Global Health and Information and Communication Technologies.” The conference was organized by the Global Climate Forum on behalf of the steering committee of the EU project GSDP in cooperation with the EU projects EUNOIA, FOC, INSITE, MULTIPLEX, NESS, and the HLRS.