Redesigning the Current bibliography for the History of Science

Manfred Laubichler recently attended the Isis Current Bibliography 2.0 Conference:

What is the future of bibliography in the digital age? Because most people think of a bibliography as simply an index of citations used to locate relevant material for their research, it might be argued that the growing ubiquity of full-text search engines is making human-compiled bibliographies superfluous. I believe that this is not the case. The current digital, data-rich environment has changed research practices in fundamental ways, but this environment has not eliminated the usefulness of specialized bibliographies. The changes do, however, force us to rethink what a bibliography can and should do. We are in the midst of a wholesale transformation in the way that scholarship takes place. How knowledge has come to be produced, saved, and shared is reformulating what scholars do. The new field of digital humanities is pushing the boundaries of this information-based world, and many scholars are building extraordinary new research tools.

Our computational and digital HPS programs are part of the group that explores the digital possibilities for the Isis Current Bibliography of the History of Science.