John Bertrand Gurdon (1933– )

TitleJohn Bertrand Gurdon (1933– )
Publication TypeMiscellaneous
Year of Publication2012
AuthorsCohmer, Sean, and Inbar Maayan
Abstract

Sir John Bertrand Gurdon further developed nuclear transplantation, the technique used to clone organisms and to create stem cells, while working in Britain in the second half of the twentieth century. Gurdon's research built on the work of Thomas King and Robert Briggs in the United States, who in 1952 published findings that indicated that scientists could take a nucleus from an early embryonic cell and successfully transfer it into an unfertilized and enucleated egg cell. Briggs and King also concluded that a nucleus taken from an adult cell and similarly inserted into an unfertilized enucleated egg cell could not produce normal development. In 1962, however, Gurdon published results that indicated otherwise. While Briggs and King worked with Rana pipiens frogs, Gurdon used the faster-growing species Xenopus laevis to show that nuclei from specialized cells still held the potential to be any cell despite its specialization. In 2012, the Nobel Prize Committee awarded Gurdon and Shinya Yamanaka its prize in physiology or medicine for for their work on cloning and pluripotent stem cells.

URLhttp://hpsrepository.mbl.edu/handle/10776/3945
Topic: 
cohmer